Currently viewing the tag: "Greece"

Yesterday, the ECB pronounced itself the official lender-of-last resort to all Euro-Zone governments. To assure that the state can always borrow at conveniently low rates has been declared an essential component of ‘maintaining financial stability’ and thus a standard plank of modern central banking. Despite all their professed differences and divergent legal frameworks, all major […]

Continue Reading

Last week, the Deutsches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW), or German Institute for Economic Research, an influential think tank, proposed an ingenious solution to the Euro Zone debt crisis. The German government should issue a Zwangsanleihe, a compulsory bond that every German with savings of EUR250,000 or more should be compelled to underwrite with 10 percent […]

Continue Reading

On Tuesday, July 3, London business paper City A.M. ran an editorial I wrote on Germany. The text is below. In the present debate on the Euro crisis, Germany is frequently portrayed as a model of economic strength, a beacon of fiscal prudence and a proponent of structural reform. Her resources seem endless and her […]

Continue Reading

Last week I was a guest on the Keiser Report with Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert on RT. Here is a link to my interview.

Continue Reading

 Should the Greeks have a referendum on whether they want to stay in the euro? Are the upcoming elections such a referendum? Would it be better for the Greeks if they left the euro? – Are you, like me, sick and tired of hearing these questions and then the answers based on the same stale […]

Continue Reading

“Europe fights back against austerity” was how The Daily Telegraph headlined its weekend election coverage. “Anti-austerity movements are gathering pace across Europe following political earthquakes in France and Greece. A total of 12 European governments have now been dismissed in three years.” As the European welfare state is officially in its death-throes none of us […]

Continue Reading

Surprise, surprise, the Euro Zone debt crisis is back. Or was it never gone? As yields on Spanish and Italian government bonds are heading higher once again, I am reminded of the old saying, you can’t fool all of the people all of the time. Not even with a trillion euros. I previously described the […]

Continue Reading

Greece was bailed out for the second time in four months. Or did it default? Well, a bit of both, I guess. All bondholders are equal. But some are more equal than others. If you are the ECB, your Greek bonds were exchanged, par for par, for new Greek bonds, and you can go on […]

Continue Reading

Infinite stupidity

On November 14, 2011 By

“The unlimited resources” of the European Central Bank (ECB) is quickly becoming the new magic mantra in political commentary and financial market analysis, now that the bigger euro-dominos are beginning to wobble and everybody realizes that nobody has the firepower to bailout Italy, or to ‘recapitalize’ (i.e. bailout again) all the banks that lent to […]

Continue Reading

Jacob Wolinsky of the US website ValueWalk.com conducted an extensive interview with me that covered a wide range of topics, from my own background and the appeal of Austrian School Economics to what I think Obama and Bernanke should do. You can read it here or here.

Continue Reading