Currently viewing the tag: "commodity prices"

It is a beautiful autumn day in London, unseasonably warm and sunny, the city looking its very best, and I am trying to find a hook for this blog. I should write about the European debt crisis, the sharp drop in equity markets last week after “Operation Twist” was announced, and the washout in commodity […]

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The main problem with having discussions about economics and financial markets is this: People look at these complex phenomena through entirely different prisms; they use vastly dissimilar – even contrasting – narratives as to what has happened, what is going on now, and what is therefore likely to happen in the future. Citing any so-called […]

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According to the mainstream press, the reason behind the present sell-off in commodities – and in many so-called ‘risk-assets’ (stupid really, all assets are risky) – is weak growth, not tighter monetary policy. At least this is how I interpret the market commentary in the Financial Times and the Wall Street Journal. The mainstream media […]

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Gordon Brown as the next head of the IMF? What a splendid idea – at least as long as Charlie Sheen is not available. No seriously, the despicable, interventionist IMF and the unpopular etatist Brown – a perfect match –perfect, I hope for further discrediting the global paper money bureaucracy, the new political elite lording […]

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It has been noted that the unrest in the Middle East is to a large degree stimulated by the rising costs of living, in particular rising food prices, and these have further been linked to the extremely expansionary stance of monetary policy by central banks around the world. These links have been identified correctly. In […]

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